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20130818
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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
see the city name down on the lower left, mississippi. the number next to the city is the derivative of the gps marker for this google location and i sort of transposed the numbers and used that. i wanted to connotate that virtual world and also there was a visual connection to the photographic heritage that was pretty wild. on top of this moment in time, there is also a breaking down of the imagery thaps in the google pictures themselves, most of these are lo fi and i chose that i guess because of the esthetics. it did not contain the same look as these and it also erode the truth and makes the lens a little bit blurry, it alters things from a technical point of view. so, you could see these pictures that sort of describe them as drive-by pictures that we are drive-by really captures this and not necessarily immersive in any way. it is literally a car driving by capturing a moment. some of this has been done in the past, walker evans took pictures out of a moving vehicle. in fact, strangely, right upstairs in the library before this talk i was looking through my side and i have on t
on the other side of the country this evening, images from mississippi here. trucks right there going straight through the water. and from panama city, florida, images coming in. apartment complex there, just completely under water. these totals are really something. >> in gulfport, mississippi, they've had six inches in two hours. and it's not over. i wish this thing would move, but the front is sitting right there. this goes through wednesday. you're going to have although two to three inches, if you are anywhere from mobile, in through southern parts of alabama there, into the panhandle of florida. and atlanta gets back into that surge of moisture. they've seen way too much rain. not only this month, but this year and there's more to come as we go through the week. >> all right, ginger zee, thank you. >>> now, to the spike in bear attacks we told you about last night re. this is the time of year when they start preparing for hibernation, looki for food. tonight here, the 12-year-old girl attacked in michigan, describing the horror for the first time. here's abc's linzie janis now. >> report
of mississippi where races suffocating part of everyday life. cory's version of the best was yet no idea these were police. he shot and fired one of these figures to protect himself and his daughter and as soon as he realized, surrendered in chapters 10 to three bullets left in the gun. the states version was cory the out the window and saw a team of police is coming at him, that he decided to take them on with a handgun that he shot and killed one of them and surrendered with the listen again. decide which of those those in areas hit by more plausible. basically he had a roach in his house that would lend him a $50 fine. he was charged and convicted of capital murder and sentenced to death. i was scared to the legal stuff that happened in between. eventually a couple years ago from his conviction was overturned by the mississippi supreme court. the prosecutors decided they would allow him to plead with manslaughter and he would get time served. at this point in prison for 10 years. at his homecoming party in mississippi, taking kids out for rides on his four wheeler and everybody's happ
, mississippi john hurt me, sonny terry brown mcgee, i played some blues harmonica. >> did you learn that open tuning style, slide style? >> i have not picked up a slide in a long time, so i do not want to embarrass myself, but yes. it was a lot of folk music, blues and early on. i fell in love with the sound of the steel string guitar. there are a lot of idiomatic thing that it does well. i studied classic guitar a bit, but the steel string, for example, we do something called a hammer on and pull off, which is -- >> you get three note for the price of one. >> you plug the string but you get four notes. i always think of that town at the the prototypical steel string guitar sound. british isles, a caltech music. i learned all the paul simon songs. as i got older -- >> he is a hell of a guitarist. people do not realize. he is not flashy, but if you try to learn his tunes, they are really hard. >> he is a brilliant guitar player. i eventually got interested in jazz, world music, everything. maybe that is one of the reasons. i enjoyed so many kinds of music, i did not have a preference. i did no
. north carolina, mississippi, texas, florida, south carolina. she is suggesting that since 1965 and 2013, the white people in the south are irrevocably racist and cannot be trusted. half of the country below the mason-dixon line still cannot be trusted. this is a person who wants to be a president of the entire united states and this is the basis on which she's going to run to turn out, as jason suggested, black vote in the south. >> this is essentially about turnout? >> i think it's entirely about turnout, paul. in 2005, the federal election reform commission headed by jimmy carter and former secretary of state jim bakker said that voter i.d. laws should be promoted because they will en franchise black voters. she's suggesting that no one could possibly disagree with her. well, serious people do disagree with her on this. >> let me ask you a political question, jason. what is the benefit for republicans of pushing -- that's what they're doing. a lot of the states pushing it are republican. not universally, republicans pushed some of the laws. are they getting much out of this politicall
kinds of other stuff happening in the summer. the great mississippi flood. the biggest natural disaster in american history. and you had al capone beginning -- the beginning of the end of al capone, and the end of prohibition. the information that it was coming to an end. you had the -- building mt. rushmoore, and coolidge announced he did not run for re-election. for reasons that are still slightly mystifying. henry ford had a madid -- a madid to build a city. so this book came not just looking at these two figures, baby ruth and lindbergh but looking at everything that was happening. it was kind of frenetic amount of activity, a great deal hoff changed the world, changed the way we perceived popular entertainment and so on. so it was constance general shall and always interesting and lively. >> host: any reason all these events happened in the summer of 1927? >> guest: they just happened in the summer of 1927. that is what kind of interesting about it. sometimes these things just happen and all of these happened then. by and large there wasn't any particular reason. they weren't there
shelton was up for it. this was a guy who was born in mississippi. he grew up on a farm in a cotton. he had a lot of different jobs through his life. he was tough as nails and he joined the military when he was 18 years old. he joined as a private and went to korea and saw action right away. he was wounded three times, won the silver star. he came back and decided i love the military. i'm going to make this my career. the only time he left the military was back just before you got married. he decided he was going to try farming again. the military had a policy that you can leave the military for 90 days and returned -- if you return within 90 days you would get your previous rank but after 90 days you have to go back to being a private and at the time he was a sergeant. on the 87th day he returned because farming in mississippi was just too hard and love to the army life and he missed it. so, he decided since he was going to make it a career he was going to do more than learn as much as he possibly could. so at 28 years old to cut off age for becoming an officer, he applied for officer
for the kennedy justice department. in 1963 in mississippi, john stepped between angry protesters and armed police to prevent a potential massacre after the murder of medgar evers. that was the kind of lawyer and later he was. years later he gave me a photo. our nation's greatness is not a birthright, it must be earned by every generation and i am confident that we can earn it for this time.
as "operation plunder dome" and plead by an fbi agent named dennis who was originally from mississippi. and he lead the investigation that ultimately resulted in buddy's conviction. after a trial people said you'll never be able to convict buddy. in a city buddy went to prison with 67% of the voters thinking he did a good job even though they thought he was guilty. when he was sentenced, the judge talked about how he was two people. he was dr. jekyll and mr. hyde app and buddy said privately to a friend later, how come i didn't get two fing paycheck. what he was kicked of racketeering and conspiracy being kind of knowing about it but not actually being physically involved in the underlying act. and buddy kind of framed it as what did i do and i was convicted of being the mayor. some of the jurors i spoke to felt otherwise that he was a guy who knew how to keep himself insulated like a mob boss he once prosecuted, ironically. and that was able to stay out of the direct line, but that he knew everything that was going on. he was the kind of guy one juror told me who know how many rolls of toilet
of the flood mitigation program that the corps of engineers engages in, we are losing much of the mississippi delta. up theseeep putting barriers to keep the channel of the river to keep it from going onto croplands and housing developments, you are losing all the silt to create the barrier islands to build up that delta to allow for the land to keep being recharged. this is part of the law of unintended consequences. housingep encouraging development closer and closer to coasts and rivers, you are losing nature's ability to mitigate itself. guest: you are absolutely right. that is one of the issues of how we manage the mississippi river and how it affects louisiana along with natural subsidence and the issues of canals for oil and gas drilling and the of those nature. provided are has withe either to wetlands dunes and beaches and as we encroach on that, we are reducing the ability for mother nature to respond and be able to protect us and that increases our flood losses. hurricane result of sandy, more than 30,000 buildings in new york city were in a flood controlled area that is now -- th
to leave mississippi in the 1960s to get married. how do you think it affected you the idea that your parent's marriage was a crime? >> well, i think that it created in me a sense of psychological exile. >> and when she was 19, her mother was murdered by her former stepfather. >> i tried to make sense of that loss. >> here the dead stand up in stone. i stand on ground once hollowed by -- >> she won a pulitzer prize in 2007. about a forgotten union regiment that fought in the civil war. >> we know that it is our duty now to keep white men as would be masters. >> she wrote that poem and would look up at a pillar marked poetry. >> and now that i do it i can't see it so clearly but i have faith that it is there. >> so she will continue to cheer lead in a world that doesn't always value that. >> trying to find a way to say what seems so necessary to be said but so difficult also to someone that i can speak intimately to. across time and space on the page that is thrilling to me. >> this summer the library of congress appointed her to a second term. but her time in washington is coming to a
and watches in effect all across the southeast in georgia and florida, parts of mississippi and alabama too. it's this stalled front and that moisture coming in off the gulf. it is going to try to make its way in the mid-atlantic. a couple light spotty >> and that's your latest forecast. lester. >> dylan, thanks. up next on "today," oscar pistorius, the double-amputee accused of murdering his high-profile girlfriend making a court appearance tomorrow. that's right after this. i like a clean kitchen. i don't do any cleaning. i make dirt. ♪ very, very heavy. i'm not big enough or strong enough for this. there should be some way to make it easier. [ doorbell rings ] [ morty ] here's a box, babe. open it up. oh my goodness! what is a wetjet? some kind of a mopping device. there's a lot of dirt on here. morty, look at how easy it is. it's almost like dancing. [ both humming ] this is called the swiffer dance. softens the enamel so it can potentially erode. once that enamel is gone, it's gone. my dentist recommended pronamel. pronamel protects your teeth from the effects of acid erosion. i don'
mother black. they had to leave mississippi in the '60s to get married. >> how did it affect you, the idea that your parents' marriage was a crime? >> well, i think that it created in me a sense of psychological exile. >> and when she was 19, her mother was murdered by her former stepfather. >> that's the moment where i really tried in the language of poetry to make sense of that loss. >> here the dead stand up in stone. white marble on confederate avenue. i stand on ground once hallowed by a web of -- >> one of the themes of her work is memory. what gets left out of the nation's public record. she won a pulitzer prize in 2007 for native guard. about a forgotten black union regiment that fought in the civil war. >> we know it is our duty now to keep white men as prisoners. rebel soldiers. would-be masters. >> she wrote that poem in the library's reading room in seat 170. sometimes to rest her eyes, she would look up at a pillar marked poetry. >> now when i do it, i can't see the word poetry so clearly. but i have faith that it's there. >> so she will continue to cheer lead. for a
the mississippi, and these were all designed from large mural paintings that you can find in the rotunda of the capitol in washington. but these were only used on the very first series and were never used on notes after the 1880's. john: so this is all still "legal tender?" mark: all legal tender. everything the federal government has issued since 1861 still retains its legal tender status. however, all of these notes have a premium value to collectors and you wouldn't want to actually want to spend them. plus, i can't imagine if you took a large note into any store that anybody would be willing to accept it. they'd all think it was counterfeit. john: so a five dollar bill from this period could be worth as little and as much as what? mark: a note from a big city, from new york or philadelphia, might be worth as little as $25, $30, $40. notes from really rare towns, or territories, or places that are highly collected and very few notes available, could be worth upwards of tens of thousands of dollars. john: mark, they say it's only money, but to me this is a very special array of currenc
of the lynching of emmitt till in mississippi. the official name of the march was march on washington for freedom. it was to call out the economic inequality and social restrictions faced by black americans in the south and in the north. it was also not dr. king's march. he was one of several speakers scheduled to be on the dais that day. the speech that martin luther king, jr. planned to deliver that day was not his dream for america. it was an accuse jays. king's speech accused the country and its leaders of handing the negro a bad check. on economic advancement, access to public spaces, education and jobs. it was only when king went off script that he spoke of his dream and gave the world the lines that have come to define him in history. after the march, king, randolph and the other leaders gathered at the white house. and kennedy reportedly lined into king and smiled saying, i have a dream. three months later kennedy was did. the following july the civil rights bill that 250,000 people marched for was passed. when we commemorate the march on washington next weekend it will be that dream and
in a small two-bedroom house in mississippi, elvis was only 21 years old that summer. ♪ you ain't nothing but a hound dog ♪ >> lee: he created a sensation by performing the song, hip gyrations and all, on both the milton berle and ed sullivan tv shows. elvis and hound dog stayed at number one for what was then a record 11 weeks. ♪ love me tender >> lee: only to be knocked off their perch by elvis himself. his fans certainly loved elvis. more fanatically though than tender. >> announcer: the tempo is 1, 2, 4 for private presley. >> reporter: even a two-year stint in the army failed to dampen the female following. as our own charles kuralt noted at this news conference upon his discharge. >> elvis, you have screaming fans out there. do you still like screaming girls? >> if it wasn't for them, i'd have to re-up in the army. i'll tell you. >> lee: elvis released 31 number one hits during his lifetime earning him the nickname the king. his death from a heart attack in 1977 at just 42 shocked his millions of fans. but hardly discouraged them. elvis impersonators thrive to this day. while de
is white. other mother black. they had to leave mississippi in the 1960s to get married. how do you think it affected you the idea that your parent's marriage was a crime? >> well, i think that it created in me a sense of psychological exile. >> and when she was 19, her mother was murdered by her former stepfather. >> i tried to make sense of that loss. >> here the dead stand up in stone. i stand on ground once hollowed by -- >> she won a pulitzer prize in 2007. about a forgotten union regiment that fought in the civil war. >> we know that it is our duty now to keep white men as would be masters. >> she wrote that poem and would look up at a pillar marked poetry. >> and now that i do it i can't see it so clearly but i have faith that it is there. >> so she will continue to cheer lead in a world that doesn't always value that. >> trying to find a way to say what seems so necessary to be said but so difficult also to someone that i can speak intimately to. across time and space on the page that is thrilling to me. >> this summer the library of congress appointed her to a second term. but he
of the mississippi, 800 square miles right here in the middle of california. these cotton growers from the south were chased out by the bull weasel, came last and they claim this land, this blakely and. they took the rivers and dams them and shoved to the flow to places where they wanted to go cotton. at some point they had to go find labor. a number of folks came to the basin and their nerd is played out here. quite okies, bitchiness and black okies. no one had ever written about lack okies. they came in the 40s when this cotton picker was started in the fields. it could take the middle swath of the fields in the 40s and 50s, but it could not take the edge of the rows. so the black okies were working across the machine that would eventually idle them, picking the edges of the cotton and in 10 years time they were idled. the women ended up becoming mates and housekeepers for wealthy white farmers, much like the south. and the men, where they occurred, found work. many of them were idled. the children left this place. when we came upon it, it was mostly old folks. when i wrote my last book, west of th
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)

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